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Too much time on social media can hurt teens’ mental health: study

Researchers conducted a four-year survey of more than 3,800 adolescents between Grades 7 and 11

A new study suggests spending too much time on social media or watching television is linked to increased symptoms of depression among teens.

Researchers conducted a four-year survey of more than 3,800 adolescents between Grades 7 and 11 in the Montreal area about their screen time and mental health.

The findings, published in JAMA Pediatrics on Monday, indicate that the longer participants spent on social media or watching TV, their risk of depression increased.

Elroy Boers, who co-authored the study, says the results suggest that media that portray an “idealized” image of adolescence are more likely to hurt teens’ self-esteem.

But the post-doctoral researcher at the Universite de Montreal’s psychiatry department says not all forms of screen time are bad for young people’s mental well-being.

He says researchers found no significant ties between time playing video games and depression.

READ MORE: Canada’s top 10 influencers have a following more than four times Canada’s population

The Canadian Press


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