B.C. Floods 2021

An excavator places rock along a bend in the Coquihalla River in Hope, B.C., Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021. The River Forecast Centre has issued another flood watch as heavy rains swell a waterway that winds through parts of Kelowna, B.C. The centre says flows on Mission Creek increased rapidly overnight and will continue to rise through Tuesday with additional rainfall. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Flood watch near Kelowna, as rain, thunderstorms persist in south, southeast

High streamflow advisories remain in place for many other rivers and streams across southern B.C

 

A car sits semi-submerged in flood waters at Camden on the outskirts of Sydney, Australia, Monday, July 4, 2022. More than 30,000 residents of Sydney and its surrounds have been told to evacuate or prepare to abandon their homes on Monday as Australia’s largest city braces for what could be its worst flooding in 18 months. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

3 feet of rain sets up 4th round of flood misery for Sydney

Area receives near the average annual rainfall for coastal areas of New South Wales in 24 hours

 

A Canadian Pacific freight train travels above the Thompson River near Lytton, B.C., on August 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

New flood watch, high stream advisories, evacuation alerts as rains swell B.C. rivers

‘Sharp rises’ in Nechako River system water levels near Vanderhoof and west of Prince George

 

Chelsea Cardno went missing on June 14, 2022 while out walking her dog JJ (Photo - @chelscardno/Instagram)

Mother of missing Kelowna woman confirms body found in flooded field is her daughter

‘It is with very heavy hearts that we have to announce that we have found our sweet Chelsea’

Chelsea Cardno went missing on June 14, 2022 while out walking her dog JJ (Photo - @chelscardno/Instagram)
An enhanced coloured sun and sky due to the wildfires south of the border silhouettes trees on a mountain top in North Vancouver, B.C., Friday, October 2, 2020. Rainy conditions that raised flood risks in north, central and southeastern British Columbia are being replaced by sunshine as a brief heat wave, the first in the province this year, offers a respite until early next week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. watches flood risk as rains ease, but heat has potential to melt snowpack

Flood watches maintained in parts of the southern Interior and northeastern B.C.

An enhanced coloured sun and sky due to the wildfires south of the border silhouettes trees on a mountain top in North Vancouver, B.C., Friday, October 2, 2020. Rainy conditions that raised flood risks in north, central and southeastern British Columbia are being replaced by sunshine as a brief heat wave, the first in the province this year, offers a respite until early next week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A Yellowstone National Park ranger is seen standing near a road wiped out by flooding along the Gardner River the week before, near Gardiner, Mont., June 19, 2022. Park officials said they hope to open most of the park within two weeks after it was shuttered in the wake of the floods. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)

Crowds flock to Yellowstone as park reopens after floods

Wildlife-rich northern half of the park will remain shuttered until at least early July

A Yellowstone National Park ranger is seen standing near a road wiped out by flooding along the Gardner River the week before, near Gardiner, Mont., June 19, 2022. Park officials said they hope to open most of the park within two weeks after it was shuttered in the wake of the floods. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)
British Columbia's provincial flag flies in Ottawa on Friday July 3, 2020. Environment Canada says the first hot spell of the year is about to settle over much of British Columbia, bringing temperatures in the low to mid-30s until at least early next week.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Rain, impending heat wave prompt warning and raise flood potential in B.C.

Thunderstorms, rain, melting snow have the potential to push those waterways above flood stage

British Columbia's provincial flag flies in Ottawa on Friday July 3, 2020. Environment Canada says the first hot spell of the year is about to settle over much of British Columbia, bringing temperatures in the low to mid-30s until at least early next week.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Abbotsford mayor Henry Braun captured video of a flooded Highway 1 between Cole Road and No. 3 Road looking east on Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)

New policy on flood mitigation to tackle risks to B.C. businesses and infrastructure

Business leaders from Chilliwack, Abbotsford, Surrey co-authored action-oriented policy

Abbotsford mayor Henry Braun captured video of a flooded Highway 1 between Cole Road and No. 3 Road looking east on Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Mission Creek is flowing at a height of 2 meters. (Jen Zielinski/Capital News)

Flood watch: Search suspended for missing woman in Kelowna water

The City of Kelowna declared a state of emergency on June 14

Mission Creek is flowing at a height of 2 meters. (Jen Zielinski/Capital News)
Missing woman Chelsea Cardno dining with best friend Josiah Crowell (contributed by Josiah Crowell)

Missing Kelowna woman ‘wouldn’t have thought twice’ to jump into creek to save dog: friend

Crowell speculates Chelsea may have followed her dog into the creek

Missing woman Chelsea Cardno dining with best friend Josiah Crowell (contributed by Josiah Crowell)
Flood waters surround a farm in Abbotsford, B.C., Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021. As B.C. heads into another summer, diversifying the supply chain can mitigate some of the economic impacts of extreme weather. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Diversifying B.C.’s supply chain crucial to combat negative impact of extreme weather

Spring runoff could cause continued issues for Interior residents, businesses

Flood waters surround a farm in Abbotsford, B.C., Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021. As B.C. heads into another summer, diversifying the supply chain can mitigate some of the economic impacts of extreme weather. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Floodwaters are seen from the air in Abbotsford, B.C., on Nov. 23, 2021. November’s floods in British Columbia that swamped homes and farms, swept away roads and bridges and killed five people are now the mostly costly weather event in provincial history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Flood of atmospheric rivers in B.C. cost $675 million in insured damage: bureau

Increase over previous estimate due to business claims where commercial insurance is more available

Floodwaters are seen from the air in Abbotsford, B.C., on Nov. 23, 2021. November’s floods in British Columbia that swamped homes and farms, swept away roads and bridges and killed five people are now the mostly costly weather event in provincial history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Bridge over Kelowna’s Mission Creek at KLO and Spiers roads. (Photo/Jacqueline Gelineau)
Bridge over Kelowna’s Mission Creek at KLO and Spiers roads. (Photo/Jacqueline Gelineau)
Rain falls near Duncan, B.C., on Sunday, January 3, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Rain, late spring thaw has large parts of B.C. watching their riverbanks

Unsettled weather has also prompted a snowfall warning for the highest elevations of Highway 3

Rain falls near Duncan, B.C., on Sunday, January 3, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
In this photo provided by the National Park Service, is high water in the Gardiner River along the North Entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Montana, that washed out part of a road on Monday, June 13, 2022. (National Park Service via AP)

Yellowstone flooding sweeps away bridge, washes out roads

Flooding hits after what park officials are calling ‘unprecedented rains’

In this photo provided by the National Park Service, is high water in the Gardiner River along the North Entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Montana, that washed out part of a road on Monday, June 13, 2022. (National Park Service via AP)
The Columbia Shuswap Regional District is making sand and bags available for filling. (CSRD file photo)

Snowmelt, rain prompts flood watch for several Shuswap rivers

Columbia Shuswap Regional District making sand and bags available

The Columbia Shuswap Regional District is making sand and bags available for filling. (CSRD file photo)
British Columbia’s provincial flag flies in Ottawa, Friday July 3, 2020. The River Forecast Centre has upgraded it ranking of the the East Kootenay region to flood watch. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Central Kootenay region in B.C. issues evacuation alert for community of Six Mile

Residents not required to leave yet, but asked to be ready to go

British Columbia’s provincial flag flies in Ottawa, Friday July 3, 2020. The River Forecast Centre has upgraded it ranking of the the East Kootenay region to flood watch. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Cattle graze on a farm on the Nicola River that was affected by flooding in November, west of Merritt, B.C., on March 23, 2022. A high streamflow advisory has been issued due to snowmelt above the North Thompson River in central British Columbia. Within the Nicola River, a streamflow advisory was issued because rain from last week is still moving through the watershed’s reservoirs. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

High streamflow advisory issued for rivers overwhelmed by November’s flooding in B.C.

Snowmelt above North Thompson will send a “pulse” of water downstream, significant rainfall not expected

Cattle graze on a farm on the Nicola River that was affected by flooding in November, west of Merritt, B.C., on March 23, 2022. A high streamflow advisory has been issued due to snowmelt above the North Thompson River in central British Columbia. Within the Nicola River, a streamflow advisory was issued because rain from last week is still moving through the watershed’s reservoirs. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Sandbags being prepared in Smithers as the Bulkley River rises. (Marisca Bakker photo)

Residents of flood-prone areas in B.C. urged to be ready to leave at short notice

Up to 70 millimetres of rain could fall in some parts of the province between Thursday and Saturday

Sandbags being prepared in Smithers as the Bulkley River rises. (Marisca Bakker photo)
A wildfire burns in the mountains north of Lytton on July 1, 2021. According to a survey 2022 survey by BCAA, most British Columbians fear more extreme weather events. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

85% of British Columbians fear another extreme weather event, but few are prepared: survey

Almost half of survey respondents taking “wait-and-see” approach, BCAA found

A wildfire burns in the mountains north of Lytton on July 1, 2021. According to a survey 2022 survey by BCAA, most British Columbians fear more extreme weather events. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)