Environment

A sign opposing coal development in the eastern slopes of the Livingston range south west of Longview, Alta., Wednesday, June 16, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Alberta town endorses community-developed policy saying no to coal mining in Rockies

High River has joined 30 organizations in signing a document pushing prohibition of coal in Alberta

 

The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)

B.C. communities to receive new annual climate action funding

Each to recieve at least $38,000 annually for next 3 years

 

The Seamor Chinook ROV claw approaching a submerged pot, as seen from the navigation controller on the vessel. (Photo submitted)

Submersible craft grapples ‘ghost’ fishing gear from Prince Rupert ocean floor

Seamor Marine involved in project to remove abandoned traps on northern coast

 

Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Coral reefs provide stunning images of a world under assault

Coral Morphologic shows real-world example of how coral communities can adapt at busy port of Miami

Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP

North America’s love affair with the lawn is getting messy

Some homeowners seeing a well-manicured lawn as an anachronism, even a threat

This 2021 image provided by LeighAnn Ferrara shows Ferrara’s young son as he watches a rabbit on a grassy patch of his White Plains, N.Y., yard, which is surrounded by planting beds of flowers, vegetables and trees. Many people are converting parts of their grass lawns into more diverse plantings. (LeighAnn Ferrara via AP
While some people may participate in No Mow May, the Nature Conservancy of Canada urges everyone to take the next step in naturalizing backyards or balconies. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
While some people may participate in No Mow May, the Nature Conservancy of Canada urges everyone to take the next step in naturalizing backyards or balconies. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Proposed cattle feedlot threatens popular but fragile Alberta lake, residents say

G&S Cattle of Ponoka, Alta., wants to pen 4,000 cattle about four kilometres west of Pigeon Lake

Don Davidson pictured at Pigeon Lake Alta, on Sunday May 1, 2022. 2022. Thousands of Alberta cottagers and homeowners are waiting nervously to see if a provincial regulator will allow a large feedlot to be developed near the popular and environmentally fragile recreational lake. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Feds enshrining right to healthy environment but no clarity on what that means

Government will have up to two years after bill takes effect to define that right’s implementation

A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
University of Northern British Columbia’s Prince George campus. (Photo courtesy UNBC)

UNBC recognized as 1 of Canada’s greenest employers

UNBC worked on lowering its energy consumption in partnership with BC Hydro

University of Northern British Columbia’s Prince George campus. (Photo courtesy UNBC)
Ryan Cootes, Erin Bremner-Mitchell, Bill Collins and Mike Williamson of Cascadia Seaweed Corporation are here seen holding up seaweed grown in Barkley Sound in July 2020. The company will receive up to $533,475 to determine the potential of three types of seaweed as an alternative feedstock for cattle. (Cascadia Seaweed Corporation/Submitted)

B.C. company chewing on the possibilities of seaweed as cattle feed

Vancouver Island’s Cascadia Seaweed will receive up to $533,475 from federal government

Ryan Cootes, Erin Bremner-Mitchell, Bill Collins and Mike Williamson of Cascadia Seaweed Corporation are here seen holding up seaweed grown in Barkley Sound in July 2020. The company will receive up to $533,475 to determine the potential of three types of seaweed as an alternative feedstock for cattle. (Cascadia Seaweed Corporation/Submitted)
Old-growth logging protestor Howard Breen says he was taken to hospital Sunday (April 24), on the 24th day of his hunger strike. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth)

B.C. man says old-growth protests escalating after brief hospitalization

68-year-old Nanaimo resident was on day 24 of his hunger strike Sunday

Old-growth logging protestor Howard Breen says he was taken to hospital Sunday (April 24), on the 24th day of his hunger strike. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth)
Howard Breen, of Nanaimo, shown in this undated handout image, says he has been on a hunger strike for 23 days and won’t stop protesting against old-growth logging until B.C.’s forests minister agrees to a public meeting. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Save Old Growth **MANDATORY CREDIT**

B.C. man wanting public meeting has ‘death-watch monitors’ on Day 23 of hunger strike

68-year-old activist protesting the logging of old growth forests

Howard Breen, of Nanaimo, shown in this undated handout image, says he has been on a hunger strike for 23 days and won’t stop protesting against old-growth logging until B.C.’s forests minister agrees to a public meeting. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Save Old Growth **MANDATORY CREDIT**
This submitted photo shows Paul Cottrell, wearing the red jacket, helping to disentangle a humpback whale.

A first as the world warms: New forecasts could help predict marine heat waves

Multiple marine heat waves have occurred since 2014 along the Washington coast

This submitted photo shows Paul Cottrell, wearing the red jacket, helping to disentangle a humpback whale.
A video captured on the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge in Metro Vancouver Thursday (April 21) morning, shows angry drivers dragging old growth logging protestors, who were blocking their commute, out of the way. (Save Old Growth/Twitter)

‘You wanna die?’: Angry commuters drag ‘Save Old Growth’ protesters off B.C. highway

Video captured clash between drivers, protestors in Metro Vancouver April 21

A video captured on the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge in Metro Vancouver Thursday (April 21) morning, shows angry drivers dragging old growth logging protestors, who were blocking their commute, out of the way. (Save Old Growth/Twitter)
View of a stockpile at the facility on Vye Road.

Toxic chemicals discharged from Abbotsford waste facility into fish-bearing creek

Company responsible is under contract with the City of Abbotsford

View of a stockpile at the facility on Vye Road.
An upstream view of BC Hydro’s Strathcona Dam. The company is under fire from the BC Wildlife Federation, which says BC Hydro isn’t meeting its environmental compensation requirements. (BC Hydro photo)

BC Hydro falling short on environmental obligations, conservation group claims

BC Wildlife Federation calls for auditor general to examine electric company

An upstream view of BC Hydro’s Strathcona Dam. The company is under fire from the BC Wildlife Federation, which says BC Hydro isn’t meeting its environmental compensation requirements. (BC Hydro photo)
A new 30-metre wide opening in the Fraser River’s North Arm Jetty allows juvenile Chinook salmon to reach a vital estuary for the first time in more than 100 years. (Photo by Alex Harris/Raincoast Conservation Foundation)

Juvenile salmon gain access to crucial B.C. habitat for first time in 100 years

New opening in Fraser River jetty allows for slow transition from fresh to salt water

A new 30-metre wide opening in the Fraser River’s North Arm Jetty allows juvenile Chinook salmon to reach a vital estuary for the first time in more than 100 years. (Photo by Alex Harris/Raincoast Conservation Foundation)
A group of Canada geese stand on railway tracks as a plant operates in the background at Hamilton Harbour in Hamilton, Ont. Tuesday December 10, 2002. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer

Biggest emitters paying smallest price on pollution, critics say

Big companies with higher emissions pay the carbon price only on what they emit above a set limit

A group of Canada geese stand on railway tracks as a plant operates in the background at Hamilton Harbour in Hamilton, Ont. Tuesday December 10, 2002. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer
The Yukon provincial flag flies on a flag pole in Ottawa, Monday July 6, 2020. Yukon’s snow survey shows record high snowpacks in many of the basins the territory monitors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Yukon’s record snowpack adds potential for flooding during ice breakup

April survey usually represents the peak snow levels in most of the territory

The Yukon provincial flag flies on a flag pole in Ottawa, Monday July 6, 2020. Yukon’s snow survey shows record high snowpacks in many of the basins the territory monitors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
B.C. announced a new Mass Timber Action Plan April 7, with an initial invesment of $1.2 million into four structures. (Black Press Media file photo)

B.C. investing in future of mass timber with 4 new structures, long-term action plan

Province looks to be leading producer in carbon-capturing material

B.C. announced a new Mass Timber Action Plan April 7, with an initial invesment of $1.2 million into four structures. (Black Press Media file photo)