Photo provided by Jennifer Lee.

Get to know Duke of Edinburgh’s Award recipient Jennifer Lee

Big adventures in the Canadian wilderness, public speaking, swimming, and more

Jennifer Lee’s journey to achieve the silver level of The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award has led her to big adventures from her hometown in Burnaby.

“One of my proudest moments was standing on the summit of the Chilkoot Pass,” Lee told Black Press Media.

She remembers standing on the edge of the Coast Mountain range in the Yukon thinking,“Wow, I’ve come this far and I can see this huge expanse of wilderness in front of me.”

Lee wanted to chase the summit to learn more about the people who’d hiked it during the Klondike Gold Rush.

She enjoyed the trail’s historical significance and saw a variety of interesting artifacts, such as a boiler.

“Somebody thought they could carry a boiler over the mountain range and very quickly realized that was not going to happen.”

And her journey isn’t over.

She plans to canoe the Yukon River and “continue to be a better Canadian” to achieve the award’s gold level.

Lee also worked on her public speaking skills with Toast Masters, volunteered at a seniors’ home, developed her endurance for swimming, and practised playing her guitar during the program.

To be eligible for the award, youth ages 14-24 must fulfill four different activities over at least one year: service to the community, development of a skill, physical recreation, and an adventurous journey in nature.

It’s divided into three levels – bronze, silver, and gold – and comes with a lapel pin, certificate, and school credit.

More than 15,000 youth participate in the program in B.C. and Yukon, and are mentored by almost 1,000 volunteers through schools, community centres, and youth organizations.

To learn more about the Duke of Edinburgh Award, click here.



baneet.braich@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Roller derby in Houston

The Bulkley Valley Roller Derby (BVRD) league hosted their first ever derby… Continue reading

Northern B.C.’s Ridley coal terminal sold, Canada divests, First Nations to own portion

Ten per cent of shares transferred to the Lax Kw’alaams Band and the Metlakatla First Nation

Recreational fishing for sockeye salmon in the Skeena River watershed temporarily closed

Effective July 11 recreational fishing will be banned until further notice

Skeena mainstem closed to recreational sockeye

Escapements expected to be below 800,000 threshold

B.C. to begin increasing coastal log export charges

New fees based on harvest cost, cedar no longer exempt

VIDEO: B.C. MLA Michelle Stilwell takes first steps in nearly 30 years

‘It actually felt like walking. It’s been 27 years… but it felt realistic to me’

Report of dead body in B.C. park actually headless sex doll

This discovery, made at Manning Park on July 10, led police to uncovering two other sex mannequins

Grand Forks fire chief found to have bullied, harassed volunteer firefighter: report

WorkSafeBC, third-party human resources investigation looking into allegations complete

Dog recovering after being drenched in hot coffee, B.C. man charged

Man was taken into custody, charged, and released pending a court date

Taekwondo instructor, 21, identified as B.C. bat rabies victim

Nick Major, 21, an instructor at Cascadia Martial Arts in Parksville

Science expedition to Canada’s largest underwater volcano departs Vancouver Island

Crews prepared for a two-week research mission to the Explorer Seamount

B.C. shipyard to get one-third of $1.5 billion frigate-repair contract

The federal government has promised to invest $7.5 billion to maintain the 12 frigates

Worried about bats? Here’s what to do if you come across one in B.C.

Bat expert with the BC Community Bat Program urges caution around the small creatures

B.C. on right road with tougher ride-hailing driver rules, says expert

The provincial government is holding firm that ride-hailing drivers have a Class 4 licence

Most Read