Volunteers sought to help B.C. residents file income taxes

Community Volunteer Income Tax Program celebrating 47 years of helping folks out

  • Feb. 14, 2018 12:25 p.m.

No one likes doing their taxes but for some people the process is just too much.

Whether it’s newcomers to Canada, students who have no experience, or people with certain physical disabilities, filling out income tax forms can be daunting.

So every year volunteers across Canada help thousands of people get it done, and volunteers are needed to help the program work.

The Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) Community Volunteer Income Tax Program (CVITP) is celebrating 47 years of helping individuals prepare their income tax and benefit returns. CVITP volunteers help complete over half a million tax returns every year for individuals who have a modest-income and a simple tax situation.

“The program relies on the commitment of community organizations to host tax clinics, and their volunteers who, as members of the community, have volunteered their time and effort to help others,” said Zubie Vuurens, CRA CVITP co-ordinator. “Helping members of your community prepare and file their tax returns, ensures these individuals receive the benefits and credits they’re entitled to without interruptions.”

The program is again seeking community organizations to host tax preparation clinics in communities throughout B.C.. They are also looking for volunteers to prepare tax returns. Individuals must be willing to work with their local community organization and have a basic understanding of income tax.

Community organizations and their volunteers have offered free tax preparation clinics in various locations including, schools, churches, seniors’ residences, and nursing homes.

Community organizations find the CVITP an excellent way to reach out to seniors, students, and newcomers to Canada.

Last year, 2,447 volunteers and 528 community organizations in B.C. and Yukon helped 105,185 people prepare and file their returns.

The CRA offers free training and tax preparation software to community organizations and their volunteers. Training sessions start in January 2018. For more information, please call 1-888-805-6662, or visit our website at canada.ca/taxes-volunteer.


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

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