This squirrel stopped for a quick visit and by the looks of the size of him, he is making out okay this winter. Squirrels love foods rich in <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein" title="Protein">protein</a>, <a class="mw-redirect" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbohydrates" title="Carbohydrates">carbohydrates</a>, and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat" title="Fat">fats</a>. They rely heavily on the buds of trees and eat a wide variety of plants, as well as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nut_(fruit)" title="Nut (fruit)">nuts</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seed" title="Seed">seeds</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conifer_cone" title="Conifer cone">conifer cones</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit" title="Fruit">fruits</a>, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fungus" title="Fungus">fungi</a>, and green <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetation" title="Vegetation">vegetation</a>. Squirrels benefit and thrive from their interaction in human environments. This gradual process of successful interaction is called synurbanization, where they lose their fear of humans. (Angelique Holuihan photo/Houston Today)

This squirrel stopped for a quick visit and by the looks of the size of him, he is making out okay this winter. Squirrels love foods rich in protein, carbohydrates, and fats. They rely heavily on the buds of trees and eat a wide variety of plants, as well as nuts, seeds, conifer cones, fruits, fungi, and green vegetation. Squirrels benefit and thrive from their interaction in human environments. This gradual process of successful interaction is called synurbanization, where they lose their fear of humans. (Angelique Holuihan photo/Houston Today)

Visiting squirrel

This squirrel stopped for a quick visit and by the looks of the size of him, he is making out okay this winter. Squirrels love foods rich in protein, carbohydrates, and fats. They rely heavily on the buds of trees and eat a wide variety of plants, as well as nuts, seeds, conifer cones, fruits, fungi, and green vegetation. Squirrels benefit and thrive from their interaction in human environments. This gradual process of successful interaction is called synurbanization, where they lose their fear of humans. (Angelique Holuihan photo/Houston Today)