The strata at La Casa denied Peter Gordan’s application to rent out his condo due to “hardships.” (Google Maps)

Vancouver man must pay $22,000 after breaking strata rules

Peter Gordon took his fight over his rented condo to the civil resolution tribunal, but lost

A Vancouver condo owner will have to pay his strata council $22,000 after he rented out his home against the bylaws, according to a recent ruling from the B.C. Civil Resolution Tribunal.

The strata initially challenged Peter Gordon’s renting of his condo in May 2016, when they wrote a letter telling him he was breaking the rules and would receive a $500 fine.

The bylaws state only six units may be rented out at a time, and additional requests are referred to a waiting list. He could avoid the fine if he evicted the tenant in 90 days.

READ MORE: Shelter struggles: Landlord takes over rental unit whenever visiting B.C. town

Tribunal documents show Gordon did not end the tenancy and did not attend a strata hearing about the issue. As a result, the strata began charging fines.

Gordon challenged the strata’s decision in BC Supreme Court in May 2017, where Justice Christopher Grauer ruled the strata must forgive his fines up to that date, and hold a new hearing.

Gordon attended that hearing, but the strata found he was still breaking the rental bylaw and would fine him $500 every week, starting on June 1, as long as his home was rented.

In October, Gordon sent a letter asking for a “hardship exemption” that would allow his current tenants to stay in the condo until their lease was up, but the strata denied it because he had provided no proof as to why one was required.

After his denial, he took up the issue with the civil resolution tribunal.

In her ruling, tribunal member Kate Campbell wrote “the owner’s evidence is somewhat unclear” about why he needed a hardship exemption and denied the request as well.

Gordon has since sold his condo. Campbell ruled the $22,000 in fines be paid out from the proceeds of that sale, which are currently held in trust.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

New Seven Sisters replacement confirmed

Mental health facility will have 25 beds, up from 20 in current facility

Terrace hospital’s business plan approved

Health Minister’s announcement opens door to construction phase

Convicted animal abuser Catherine Adams to return to Quesnel court next week

Adams is facing a breach of probation charge stemming from a 2015 conviction in Smithers

Northwest Fire Centre open burn ban lifted

Recent rain, cooler temperatures have lowered the region’s fire risk

Telkwa pot plant application passes review

Cannabis company claims new Health Canada regulations are working in its favour

Killer of Calgary mother, daughter gets no parole for 50 years

A jury found Edward Downey guilty last year in the deaths of Sara Baillie, 34, and five-year-old Taliyah Marsman

Cost jumps 35% for Trans-Canada Highway widening in B.C.

Revelstoke-area stretch first awarded under new union deal

Is vegan food a human right? Ontario firefighter battling B.C. blaze argues it is

Adam Knauff says he had to go hungry some days because there was no vegan food

Winds helping in battle against fire threatening northern Alberta town

Nearly 5,000 people have cleared out of High Level and nearby First Nation

B.C. sends 267 firefighters to help battle Alberta wildfires

Out of control fires have forced evacuations in the province

LETTER: Fletcher ‘blurs reality’ on B.C. union public construction

Bridge, highway projects awarded to companies, not unions

Federal government funds millions to help B.C. police spot drugged driving

Many police departments have expressed wariness about using the only government-approved roadside test

Judge: Mississippi 6-week abortion ban ‘smacks of defiance’

The new law would prohibit most abortions once a fetal heartbeat can be detected

Most Read