Jamie Duong is shown in Toronto, Monday, Feb.3, 2014. Canada’s top court will decide today on the validity of a now-repealed law that barred long-term Canadian expats from voting. Two Canadians living in the U.S., including Duong, launched the challenge to part of the Canada Elections Act.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Diana Mehta

Supreme Court rules restrictions on expat voting unconstitutional

The country’s top court said the restriction could not be justified

The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled a law that had restricted voting rights for long-term expats for the last 25 years was unconstitutional.

In a ruling today, the country’s top court said the restriction could not be justified.

The court said the idea of electoral fairness advanced by the government was vague.

The case was brought by two Canadians who have lived for years in the United States.

They maintained a 1993 law barring expats abroad for more than five years from voting violated their charter rights to vote.

The Liberal government scrapped the ban last month but the long-running case proceeded.

READ MORE: Trudeau faces questions about immigration, trade, Saudi arms deal

Jamie Duong, of Ithaca, N.Y., and Gill Frank, of Richmond, Va., argued nothing warranted the abridgment of their constitutional right to vote.

They insisted they maintain deep ties to Canada, and taxes and other laws passed by Parliament could still affect them.

They initially succeeded in court but lost on appeal, prompting the Supreme Court to weigh in.

The Liberal government did away with the ban last month but the court case proceeded.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Canfor announces permanent closure of Isle Pierre Mill

The company also announced curtailments at their pulp mills in Prince George.

COVID-19 and returning to safe operation

WorkSafeBC recognizes the importance of worker safety as businesses look to resume… Continue reading

Local governments receiving provincial grants

Meant for infrastructure projects and planning

LIVE: Procession to honour Snowbirds Capt. Jennifer Casey comes to Halifax

Snowbirds service member died in a crash in Kamloops one week ago

B.C. employers worry about safety, cash flow, second wave in COVID-19 restart

A survey found 75 per cent of businesses worry about attracting customers

Ex-BC Greens leader Andrew Weaver says province came close to early election

Disagreement centred on the LNG Canada project in northern B.C.

Canada’s NHL teams offer options to season-ticket holders

Canadian teams are offering refunds, but also are pushing a number of incentives to let them keep the money

B.C. premier says lessons to learn from past racism during response to pandemic

B.C. formally apologized in the legislature chamber in 2008 for its role in the Komagata Maru tragedy

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Snowbirds to remain at Kamloops Airport indefinitely after fatal crash

small contingent of the Snowbirds team is staying in Kamloops, acting as stewards of the jets

Oak Bay man stumbles upon eagle hunting seal, grabs camera just in time

The eagle did ‘a perfect butterfly stroke to shore’ with its prey, photographer says

82% of all test-positive COVID-19 cases in B.C. have recovered

B.C. had 303 active cases as of Saturday, May 23

Most Read