Residents offered rebate to exchange old wood stoves

The B.C. government gave $10,450 to boost the Wood Stove Exchange Program, run by the local Airshed Management Society.

Glacer Electric re-calibrates the weather sensors above the Houston Fire Department.

Glacer Electric re-calibrates the weather sensors above the Houston Fire Department.

The B.C. government gave $10,450 to boost the Wood Stove Exchange Program.

Run by the Bulkley Valley Lakes District Airshed Management Society, the program is to encourage residents to replace old wood stoves with cleaner burning models.

The funding from the B.C. government gives residents a $250 rebate on the purchase of any new certified domestic solid fuel burning device or high efficiency appliance. That includes gas, propane, pellet or electric stoves.

“Replacing an old wood stove with a more environmentally friendly model through the Wood Stove Exchange Program is a practical and effective way to reduce emissions,” said Nechako Lakes MLA John Rustad said.

By exchanging stoves, “families in our community will help improve air quality in our community,” he added.

New emissions-certified wood stoves burn one-third less wood; and reduce smoke and particulates entering the atmosphere by up to 90 percent.

This year $190,000 is being provided to 13 communities though the Wood Stove Exchange Program. Since it was launched in 2008, over $2.3 million has been provided to purchase over 6,000 cleaner burning models, equating to a reduction of more than 370 tonnes of particulate matter being pumped into the air.