‘Recall fatigue’: Canadians may avoid certain foods over holidays

In the winter, Canada’s supply of fresh fruit and vegetables tends to come from very specific areas.

‘Recall fatigue’: Canadians may avoid certain foods over holidays

A string of high-profile produce recalls may lead to shortages of the most recent culprits ahead of the holidays. But, even if cauliflower and some lettuce varieties stay in stock, experts say consumers may be hesitant to buy these and serve them as part of a big, family meal.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced over the weekend a recall of certain cauliflower and lettuce products produced by California-based Adam Bros. Farming Inc. that were distributed in at least six provinces. There have been no reported illnesses associated with the wrapped cauliflower, and green leaf and red leaf lettuce that’s sold in bulk without a brand name.

“We are likely — in the short run at least — to be short of those products,” said Mike von Massow, an associate professor at the University of Guelph.

In the winter, Canada’s supply of fresh fruit and vegetables tends to come from very specific areas, he said. The farm in question likely represents a significant proportion of the total cauliflower and leafy greens arriving in Canada and stopping those imports could create a strain on supply, resulting in higher prices for what is safe and available ahead of the holidays.

Loblaw Companies Ltd., Empire Co. Ltd. and Metro Inc. did not immediately respond to a request for comment on whether they sold the farm’s products and whether they anticipate supply falling below demand.

Romaine lettuce, on the other hand, seems to be back in stock in at least some grocers’ stores after a recent recall that prompted many companies to temporarily stop selling the product.

Empire, the parent company of Sobeys Inc., has now sourced romaine from an unaffected region and the product is back in stock, an executive said during a conference call with analysts last week.

Read more: Some types of cauliflower, lettuce recalled over E. coli fears

Read more: Food agency taking steps to prevent entry of lettuce suspected in E. coli cases

There are alternatives for each of these items, of course, like swapping brussels sprouts for cauliflower.

However, folks tend to be highly traditional over the holidays and some dishes may demand specific ingredients.

“I think about our Christmas traditions and we have very sort of established meals over the holidays,” said von Massow.

“And so, that could put a crimp if cauliflower is central to that for families.”

They may have to pay more than they otherwise would for that ingredient, he said.

A more budget-minded option may be purchasing frozen cauliflower, said Simon Somogyi, a professor at the University of Guelph who studies food consumer behaviour.

It’s possible though, consumers may simply avoid these products and others implicated in recent recalls.

This recall comes shortly after a wide-ranging romaine lettuce recall in the country and south of the border. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency halted romaine lettuce imports from certain California counties after the leafy green was linked to 28 cases of E. coli in the country. Grocery stores pulled romaine lettuce off their shelves and many restaurants stopped serving dishes with the ingredient at the time.

“I think we’re definitely in a period of recall fatigue and there seems to be so many recalls of late that consumers are getting just confused and that’s a concern,” Somogyi said.

Canadians should be comforted by the fact that authorities have pinpointed the location of the most recent outbreak of cauliflower and leaf lettuce, he said.

But he wouldn’t be surprised if they’re cutting back on romaine consumption as a U.S.-Canadian investigation has yet to determine the source contamination for that outbreak.

Some have speculated that a deadly 2006 E. coli outbreak linked to spinach, for example, prompted consumers to favour kale instead.

People may also be more vigilant about what they serve others over the holidays as they tend to be bigger meals than usual, said von Massow.

“You also don’t want to be the person that served the entire family of 18 the vegetable that made them sick.”

Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Workers had a busy time today repairing a broken main water line. (District of Houston photo)
Water service being restored

Main line on 13th had broken

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week following the news that the remains of as many as 215 children were found buried on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. The flags were raised back up yesterday. (Houston Today photo)
Flags lowered in memory

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week… Continue reading

Bruce Tang- Unsplash photo
World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

“Older adults in our communities continue to find themselves in vulnerable situations… Continue reading

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Most Read