Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

There are three Americans two Russians and one Canadian living on the space station

In this image taken from NASA Television, Cygnus capsule arrives at the International Space Station with food galore, following a 1 1/2-day journey from Virginia, Friday, April 19, 2019. Space station astronaut Anne McClain used a robot arm to capture the capsule as they soared 250 miles (402.32 kilometers) above Earth. (NASA TV via AP)

A private cargo ship brought food galore to the International Space Station on Friday.

Space station astronaut Anne McClain used a robot arm to capture Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus capsule as they soared 258 miles (415 kilometres) above France.

READ MORE: SpaceX’s new crew capsule aces space station docking

The Cygnus and its 7,600-pound (3,450-kilogram) shipment rocketed from Wallops Island, Virginia, on Wednesday, completing the trip in a day and a half. It holds numerous science experiments, including 40 mice taking part in a tetanus vaccination study, and three small free-flying robots to assist astronauts inside and out.

There are also more than 800 meals for the six station residents, including the makings for a fine Easter feast. NASA packed pork chops with gravy, potatoes au gratin and lemon meringue pudding, among other space specialties.

Northrop Grumman named this Cygnus the S.S. Roger Chaffee after the youngest of the three astronauts who died in the Apollo 1 spacecraft fire in 1967. Chaffee was the only one on the crew who never made it to space.

“It’s great to have the S.S. Roger Chaffee officially on board,” McClain radioed. “We never forget that we stand on the shoulders of giants. Please know that every day we remember his sacrifice and that we will continue to honour his legacy by pursuing his passion for exploration. To the S.S. Roger Chaffee, welcome aboard.”

Besides McClain, there are two other Americans living on the space station, as well as two Russians and one Canadian. They will receive another shipment in just over a week from NASA’s other commercial supplier, SpaceX.

Marcia Dunn, The Associated Press

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