From left, World War II veterans Fred Seeley, Bob Sear, George Chow, June Illet, Ken Brind, John Belsky, Franke Poole, and Rudi Hoenson have tea at Government House with Premier John Horgan and Lt. Gov. Janet Austin, May 27, 2019. (B.C. government)

Premier joins B.C. veterans to mark 75th anniversary of D-Day

Ceremonies recall Allied assault on Juno Beach in Normandy

B.C. Premier John Horgan is making his second visit to Juno Beach to remember the sacrifice of Canadian soldiers at the D-Day invasion of occupied France in 1944.

“Years ago, during a family vacation to Europe, I found myself standing on Juno Beach in France,” Horgan wrote in a personal blog as the anniversary approached. “I pictured the blue water obscured by boats as thousands of soldiers stormed the shore under heavy gunfire. My eyes filled with tears.”

At the ceremony, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau read an accounts of some of the veterans who landed at Normandy to launch the liberation of France, the Netherlands and ultimately Germany, where Adolf Hitler’s forces were defeated the following year.

RELATED: D-Day was an effort like none before or since

RELATED: Queen, world leaders honour D-Day veterans

B.C. veterans were invited to an anniversary reception at Government House in Victoria last week, where they were greeted by Horgan and Lt. Gov. Janet Austin.

Among them was George Chow, who signed up at Victoria’s Bay Street Armoury two months before he turned 19, without telling his parents. Chow made the trip to Normandy to remember his experience at Juno Beach.

Another veteran honoured was Alice Adams of Victoria, a member of the Canadian Naval Intelligence Service who worked to intercept German naval messages. Also attending was Frank Poole, whose bomber was shot down in January, 1945. He spent two months in a prison camp before the liberation in April.

“As I stand on Juno Beach on June 6, I will proudly wear a pin that was given to me by the Canadian Scottish Regiment and I will carry a plaque, given to me by Legion Manor Victoria,” Horgan wrote. “This pin and plaque signify the stories that live inside Alice, Frank and George, and veterans just like them.”


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

All Nations Driving Academy gets $360K boost from province

Terrace-based driving school bridges gap in services for remote northwest B.C. communities

Skeena Watershed reopened for recreational pink and coho

Four sections and tributaries remain closed

Skeena-Bulkley Valley candidates react to finding Trudeau broke ethics law

The election campaign is heating up before the writ has even dropped

Burns Lake golfers to help end world hunger

Burns Lake residents will bring together charity and golf at the Grip… Continue reading

Houston area ski club proposes new community forest

Morice Mountain has ‘huge untapped potential’

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

U16 B.C. fastpitch team named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

Most Read