The Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline is proposing a work camp just south of Buck Falls (Goosly Falls on map).

The Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline is proposing a work camp just south of Buck Falls (Goosly Falls on map).

Pipeline work camp proposed near Buck Creek Falls

The proposed camp may operate two to three years and peak at 1,000 people, with most services managed on site.

The proposed Coastal GasLink pipeline work camp near Buck Falls may peak at 1,000 people.

The camp was discussed in detail at the Coastal GasLink Open House in Houston last Monday, April 13.

Coastal GasLink is a natural gas pipeline proposed by TransCanada to run from Dawson Creek to Kitimat.

The final investment decision and subsequent forest clearing and construction is expected in 2016.

Greg Cano, Coastal GasLink Project Director, says they do not know exactly when the decision will be made, but they will be ready to start construction by August 2016.

Starting this spring, Coastal GasLink plans to have workers in this area doing engineering and environmental field studies, Cano said.

Work camp locations will be finalized early 2016 and the earliest camps will be built is late 2016, he said.

The pipeline runs 23 kilometres south of Houston and includes a proposed work camp southwest of Buck Falls.

Cano says they may have two work camps in that area, but most likely one, which will operate for two to three years.

The size of the camp will peak at 1,000 people, but average between 300 and 500 people, he said.

Traffic will use the Morice River Road, and will be told not to use Buck Flats Road, he said.

To avoid having “300 pickups driving back and forth to Houston,” Cano says they will look at having buses to bring people into town.

He says the camp will have a controlled alcohol policy.

“Having a dry camp in an area where alcohol is readily available close by, only leads to hundreds of guys driving in, having a beer and driving back,” Cano said.

So instead they will have alcohol, but controlled with zero tolerance for abuse, he said.

“If there is a brawl on the camp, we do have security and those people will be removed and fired immediately.”

Sewage will be treated onsite, there will be on site paramedics and nurses, Cano said.

Asked about an emergency medical plan, Cano said it has not been confirmed.

“Part of that will be looking at what is available,” he said.

“Is it better for us maybe to contribute something to the local health region so that there is a long-term legacy… or is it better for us to make our own plans and have a helicopter evacuation to take them to Vancouver.”

It will be decided on in consultation with Northern Health, camp providers and prime contractors, he said.