Part of a hardware store’s roof is shown against the side of a building in this photo provide by Terry Osmond after high winds in Port-aux-Basque, Newfoundland on Monday Dec. 25, 2017. Gusts reached up to 120 kilometres per hour in the community in recent days, and the ferries between Channel-Port aux Basques, N.L., and North Sydney, N.S. cancelled service due to rough weather in the Cabot Strait. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Terry Osmond

Part of a hardware store’s roof is shown against the side of a building in this photo provide by Terry Osmond after high winds in Port-aux-Basque, Newfoundland on Monday Dec. 25, 2017. Gusts reached up to 120 kilometres per hour in the community in recent days, and the ferries between Channel-Port aux Basques, N.L., and North Sydney, N.S. cancelled service due to rough weather in the Cabot Strait. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Terry Osmond

Newfoundland hit by winter storm

Winter storm blasts Newfoundland for more than three days now

The winds in Channel-Port aux Basques on Newfoundland’s southwestern coast often blow hard, but trucker Terry Osmond says he can’t remember a holiday weekend when the gusts have hit his town with such force.

“It’s terrible,” he said Wednesday, as he drove his fuel truck around the port where the Marine Atlantic ferry that runs to Nova Scotia was tied up due to high seas.

“We’ve been at it for the past three days now, and we’ve had blizzard conditions at times,” said Osmond, 57.

As he made his deliveries on Wednesday, he took photos of the damage, including roofing that blew off the local Home Hardware store and siding that was detached from buildings.

“I don’t remember wind like this in years,” he said. “But the power stayed on. We’re lucky for the power.”

Much of Newfoundland and Labrador was under wind or blizzard warnings on Wednesday, and Marine Atlantic ferry service between Port aux Basques and North Sydney, N.S., was cancelled.

RELATED: Power restored to thousands in Nova Scotia

The ferry service was advising passengers to check its website for updates on when travel would resume, with crossings delayed until Thursday, according to website postings as of 10 a.m. local time.

Environment Canada was reporting flurries and snow squalls combined with winds gusting to 110 kilometres per hour in some parts of the province.

The windchills were in the minus 20 Celsius range.

The only area not under warnings was the Buchans and the interior region in the centre of the province.

The RCMP in Deer Lake was warning that travel conditions were bad, with high winds causing white-out conditions on the highways.

Environment Canada said conditions were expected to improve Wednesday night as winds shift to the northwest and begin to ease.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Workers had a busy time today repairing a broken main water line. (District of Houston photo)
Water service being restored

Main line on 13th had broken

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week following the news that the remains of as many as 215 children were found buried on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. The flags were raised back up yesterday. (Houston Today photo)
Flags lowered in memory

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week… Continue reading

Bruce Tang- Unsplash photo
World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

“Older adults in our communities continue to find themselves in vulnerable situations… Continue reading

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Most Read