Soft-baked cookies from Aurora Cannabis Enterprises are photographed at the Ontario Cannabis Store in Toronto on Friday, January 3, 2020. The arrival of legal cannabis edibles, vapes and other products in Ontario won’t necessarily meet the government’s stated goal of cutting into the black market, according to industry observers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

Soft-baked cookies from Aurora Cannabis Enterprises are photographed at the Ontario Cannabis Store in Toronto on Friday, January 3, 2020. The arrival of legal cannabis edibles, vapes and other products in Ontario won’t necessarily meet the government’s stated goal of cutting into the black market, according to industry observers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

New cannabis products may not eat into black market, experts say

Experts say the legal products will have to differentiate themselves somehow

The arrival of legal cannabis edibles, vapes and other products in Ontario won’t necessarily meet the government’s stated goal of cutting into the black market, according to industry observers.

The Ontario Cannabis Store, the province’s pot distributor, has announced that a raft of new products is slated to start appearing in brick-and-mortar retailers on Monday and be available for online purchase 10 days later.

But those keeping an eye on Canada’s burgeoning cannabis industry said a combination of federal health regulations and Ontario’s own track record around product prices may fail to make the legal wares as enticing as alternatives still readily available through illicit channels.

“I know the OCS wants to move towards a thousand stores, but eventually you’re going to have to have a thousand people willing to participate in the legal market,” said Omar Khan, national cannabis sector lead with Hill+Knowlton Strategies. “They’ll only do that if they can be price-competitive with the illicit market.”

READ MORE: Cannabis cookies, vapes, beverages, creams arriving in B.C. stores

Edibles and comparable cannabis products became legal across the country in October, marking the second wave of the federal government’s legalization scheme launched the year before, but Monday will mark the first time such products are available for government-sanctioned purchase in Ontario.

The OCS said 59 new products, including a variety of vapes, edibles and a tea, will hit store shelves on Monday and be available for sale online effective Jan. 16. The province’s pot distributor said the number of products is expected to rise to 100 as they receive regulatory approval in the next few months.

But the OCS warned that supplies will be tight during the first few weeks of edible sales, echoing warnings that sounded across the country in the early days of legalization.

While industry observers said the supply crunch may have kept the black market thriving early on, they cite different potential hurdles facing Ontario this time around.

Khan said federal health regulations that limit the amount of cannabis contained in legal products will pose a likely barrier.

He said the rules currently limit consumers to a maximum purchase of 30 mg worth of products at a time and don’t allow any individual item to contain more than 10mg. The United States, by contrast, have allowed products to be sold in up to 100 mg packets in jurisdictions where cannabis has been legalized.

“This makes it more difficult to get regular consumers to shift away from the illicit market where ingestible products are readily available without these restrictions,” he said.

But Khan said a more formidable barrier comes from the way Ontario’s cannabis market has evolved, with the OCS acting as both an online retailer and wholesaler of all cannabis products.

The OCS has the power to purchase goods from their producers, set prices and distribute them to retailers, Khan said, noting such a system isn’t conducive to lower prices.

He cited the system in place in Saskatchewan, which sees producers negotiate directly with retailers to set prices, as more likely to keep retail costs down.

For its part, the OCS argues that its new slate of products can cut into black market sales. Edibles will cost between $7 and $14, beverages are priced at between $4 and $10, vape products will sell for between $25 and $125, topicals will be available for between $15 and $55, and concentrates are expected to sell for between $30 and $70.

“We’ve compared our offerings to similar products in the illegal market to ensure that our initial retail will be competitive,” OCS Senior Director of Merchandising Kevin Lam said when the new products were unveiled last week.

READ MORE: Quebec raising legal age for cannabis to 21, the strictest in the country

But Michael Armstrong, an associate business professor at Brock University who analyzes cannabis market data, said Ontario has a history of pricing products on the higher end of the spectrum.

Numbers he calculated after the first six months of legalization suggested Ontario implemented a 70 per cent markup on goods available at the time. That figure, while shy of the 90 per cent markup seen in Newfoundland, was also well above rates set in other provinces such as Quebec and New Brunswick.

Federal records show that Ontario’s current cannabis excise tax of about 11.4 per cent also falls in the top half of the national range, though considerably lower than jurisdictions such as Alberta and Nunavut.

Armstrong cautioned, however, that assessing prices on edibles is more complex than comparing costs of raw cannabis products.

He said producers will be working hard to distinguish themselves and their offerings through quality control, formulation and other factors, noting some consumers may well prove willing to pay a premium for what they perceive to be a better product.

That quality issue, he said, may prove fruitful in combatting illicit sales even if prices stay high.

“The producers are hoping that these new products are going to allow them to differentiate themselves,” Armstrong said. “If they can come up with a cookie or a tea that people really like, then they can charge a higher price than the black market and still attract customers.”

Michelle McQuigge, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Jill Mackenzie carefully replaces books on the shelves at the Houston Public Library. (Angelique Houlihan photo)
District approves annual library grant

Craft kits featured for summer reading club

The tradition of Houston Christian School grads giving Bibles to incoming kindergarten students will take place this year, but outdoors and in a modified fashion. (File photo)
Houston Christian School grad day is June 24

Grads themselves have set tone for the day, says teacher

Scott Richmond will be starting as the new vice principal for HSS and TSE. (Submitted/Houston Today)
Houston gets a new vice principal

Scott Richmond takes over from Dwayne Anderson who moved to Smithers

A Pacific Salmon Foundation grant of $3,000 is going towards the tree plantations. (Cindy Verbeek photo/Houston Today)
550 trees planted in Houston through A Rocha

Houston Christian School students and volunteers help with the tree planting

Currently the Houston station has 16 paramedics, two ambulances and one community paramedic vehicle. (File photo)
Retirement of longtime paramedics worries Houston community

“No loss of service,” assures BC Emergency Health Services

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

Barbara Violo, pharmacist and owner of The Junction Chemist Pharmacy, draws up a dose behind vials of both Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines on the counter, in Toronto, Friday, June 18, 2021. An independent vaccine tracker website founded by a University of Saskatchewan student says just over 20 per cent of eligible Canadians — those 12 years old and above — are now fully vaccinated. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
At least 20% of eligible Canadians fully vaccinated, 75% with one dose: data

Earlier projections for reopening at this milestone didn’t include Delta variant

This undated file photo provided by Ernie Carswell & Partners shows the home featured in the opening and closing scenes of The Brady Bunch in Los Angeles. Do you know the occupation of Mike Brady, the father in this show about a blended family? (Anthony Barcelo/Ernie Carswell & Partners via AP, File)
QUIZ: A celebration of dad on Father’s Day

How much do you know about famous fathers?

Emily Steele holds up a collage of her son, 16-year-old Elijah-Iain Beauregard who was stabbed and killed in June 2019, outside of Kelowna Law Courts on June 18. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
Kelowna woman who fatally stabbed teen facing up to 1.5 years of jail time

Her jail sentence would be followed by an additional one to 1.5 years of supervision

Cpl. Scott MacLeod and Police Service Dog Jago. Jago was killed in the line of duty on Thursday, June 17. (RCMP)
Abbotsford police, RCMP grieve 4-year-old service dog killed in line of duty

Jago killed by armed suspect during ‘high-risk’ incident in Alberta

The George Road wildfire near Lytton, B.C., has grown to 250 hectares. (BC Wildfire Service)
B.C. drone sighting halts helicopters fighting 250 hectares of wildfire

‘If a drone collides with firefighting aircraft the consequences could be deadly,’ says BC Wildfire Service

A dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a vaccination site in Vancouver Thursday, March 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
NACI advice to mix vaccines gets varied reaction from AstraZeneca double-dosers

NACI recommends an mRNA vaccine for all Canadians receiving a second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

A aerial view shows the debris going into Quesnel Lake caused by a tailings pond breach near the town of Likely, B.C., Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Updated tailings code after Mount Polley an improvement: B.C. mines auditor

British Columbia’s chief auditor of mines has found changes to the province’s requirements for tailings storage facilities

A North Vancouver man was arrested Friday and three police officers were injured after a 10-person broke out at English Bay on June 19, 2021. (Youtube/Screen grab)
Man arrested, 3 police injured during 10-person brawl at Vancouver beach

The arrest was captured on video by bystanders, many of whom heckled the officers as they struggled with the handcuffed man

Most Read