Scott Fraser, B.C.’s Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Harold Leighton, Chief Councillor of the Metlakatla First Nation and Carolyn Bennett, federal Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations sign the transition agreement. (Contributed photo)

Scott Fraser, B.C.’s Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Harold Leighton, Chief Councillor of the Metlakatla First Nation and Carolyn Bennett, federal Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations sign the transition agreement. (Contributed photo)

Metlakatla transitions treaty negotiations to Stage 5

Indigenous nation near Prince Rupert moves closer to self-governance agreement with province

Metlakatla First Nation has signed an agreement with the federal and provincial governments that has advanced its treaty negotiations to the next transition.

On Feb. 28, the agreement to “build a collaborative government-to-government relationship” was announced stating that the parties will finalize Stage 5 within two years. Within that time, outstanding issues will be renegotiated. There are six stages in the treaty negotiation process.

“This Transition Agreement and the strong foundation that it sets for our treaty is a positive step towards reconciliation. We look forward to working with both levels of government to realize their commitments to recognition and reconciliation. We will bring to our members a document that will allow our Nation to protect our rights, our territory and our culture for generations to come,” said Harold Leighton, Chief Councillor of the Metlakatla First Nation, in the press release.

In the next two years, the parties will move toward a “core” approach to the treaty. The three parties will look into self-governance, resources, land ownership, and law, all of which would go into a “constitutionally protected core treaty”.

READ MORE: Metlakatla seniors’ housing development defined by medicine wheel design

Some flexibility will be considered through supplementary agreements, according to the press release.

“Treaties are one of the key paths to comprehensive reconciliation with First Nations, so I’m glad to see this collaborative work reach such an important milestone… Like our relationships, this agreement is flexible and will grow and evolve over time, working for all parties into the future,” said Scott Fraser, B.C.’s Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Leighton, along with Fraser and Carolyn Bennett, federal Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations all signed the Metlakatla Transition to Stage Five and Treaty Revitalization Agreement.

Metlakatla are one of the seven Tsimshian First Nations on the north coast of B.C., and their community is based on the Tsimshian Peninsula near Prince Rupert.

For full text of the agreement visit www.metlakatla.ca

READ MORE: After 30 years Metlakatla Development Corporation releases economic impact report

To report a typo, email: editor@thenorthernview.com.


Shannon Lough | Editor
Shannon Lough 
Send Shannon email
Like the The Northern View on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

First Nations

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

FILE – A COVID-19 vaccine being prepared. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)
B.C. seniors 80 years and older to get COVID vaccine details over next 2 weeks: Henry

Province is expanding vaccine workforce as officials ramp up age-based rollout

(Black Press file photo)
Charges laid against two suspects in pre-Christmas home invasion

An 88-year-old woman was hospitalized after being bear-sprayed in the face Dec. 18, 2020

Liam and Tyler Spaans, (L-R), are two of the current lifeguards at the Houston Leisure Facility. (Houston Leisure Services file photo)
Leisure facility anticipates need for lifeguards

Has been challenged in the past

Residents rank snow removal as a high priority within District boundaries. (Houston Today file photo)
Road work and snow removal ranked as important in citizen survey

But residents also expressed dissatisfaction with each

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)
Majority of British Columbians now prefer routine virtual doctor’s visits: study

More than 82% feel virtual health options reduce wait times, 64% think they lead to better health

Captain and Maria, a pair of big and affectionate akbash dogs, must be adopted together because they are so closely bonded. (SPCA image)
Shuswap SPCA seeks forever home for inseparable Akbash dogs

A fundraiser to help medical expenses for Captain and Maria earned over 10 times its goal

The missing camper heard a GSAR helicopter, and ran from his tree well waving his arms. File photo
Man trapped on Manning mountain did nearly everything right to survive: SAR

The winter experienced camper was overwhelmed by snow conditions

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen, all 20, drown in the Sooke River in February 2020. (Contributed photos)
Coroner confirms ‘puddle jumping’ in 2020 drowning deaths of 3 B.C. men

Cory Mills, Eric Blackmore and A.J. Jensen pulled into raging river driving through nearby flooding

Castlegar doctor Megan Taylor contracted COVID-19 in November. This photo was taken before the pandemic. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay doctor shares experience contracting COVID-19

Castlegar doctor shares her COVID experience

Ashley Paxman, 29, is in the ICU after being struck by a vehicle along Highway 97 Feb. 18, 2021. She remains in critical condition. (GoFundMe)
Okanagan woman in ICU with broken bones in face after being struck by car

She remains in serious condition following Feb. 18 incident

Vancouver International Women in Film Festival kicks off March 5.
Women in Film Festival features two B.C. filmmakers

The 16th annual festival kicks off March 5, 2021

The booklet roots present day activism in the history of racist policies, arguing the history must be acknowledged in order to change. (CCPA)
New resource dives into 150 years of racist policy in B.C.

Racist history must be acknowledged in order to change, authors say

Most Read