Former Sidney mayor Steve Price said he was not trying to slur federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May, when he used the term “Karma’s a bitch” in a tweet (Black Press File)

Former Sidney mayor Steve Price said he was not trying to slur federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May, when he used the term “Karma’s a bitch” in a tweet (Black Press File)

Former Sidney mayor clarifies ‘karma’ cliche use in tweet at Elizabeth May

Steve Price says phrase was not meant as a personal slur

The former mayor of Sidney used what many would consider a pejorative slang with a female connotation against federal Green party leader and long-time local MP Elizabeth May during a social media exchange that rehashed the last federal and municipal elections.

Steve Price, who was mayor of Sidney from 2015 and 2018, used the term “karma’s a b****” in a tweet aimed at May in which he was commenting on one of her tweets. In her tweet, May wrote that “NDP MPs losing in Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan must wonder why [NDP leader Jagmeet] Singh threw everything at a dishonest campaign on Vancouver Island.”

“That’s exactly what local Green Party campaign organizers did during the last Sidney civic election to elect a green slate, glad to see it was used on you as well, karma’s a b****,” wrote Price in response to an exchange between May and New Democrat Alistair MacGregor, who retained his seat of Cowichan-Malahat-Langford in arguing May experienced the very thing that happened in the 2018 municipal election.

He said later in an interview that the comment was neither meant as a personal slur against nor as an attack against female politicians in general.

“That had nothing to do with what I was talking about,” he said. “I was talking basically about the abuse of political power during an election. Like I say, she is a good friend of mine. It was no slur against her whatsoever.” Speaking to reporters last week, May had complained about the treatment of female politicians both in the digital and analog world.

Price said later that he used the term “karma’s a b****” to describe the phenomenon of experiencing the very same thing inflicted upon others. Price pointed out that he later praised May’s apparent interest in becoming the Speaker of the House of Commons.

RELATED: Regional election results in Greater Victoria retain the status quo

This virtual exchange between May on one hand and Price and MacGregor on the other marks a continuation of a larger debate over the causes of the Greens’ performance during the last federal election, during which they elected three MPs, but failed to make a larger breakthrough.

With her initial tweet that sparked Price’s tweet, May repeated earlier complaints about the New Democratic campaign on Vancouver Island, where the Greens were hoping to make a number of seats from the New Democrats. But the Greens ultimately failed to pick up the ridings of Victoria and Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke.

Speaking to reporters on the night of the federal election held Oct. 21, she accused the New Democrats of having launched “concentrated campaigns of disinformation” aimed only at Vancouver Island seats.

“We really learned some things,” she said later. “We didn’t think that smears and attacks would be sufficient to erode the leads we had. So we were wrong and we didn’t respond in kind. We basically didn’t respond at all. We assumed that voters would be as outraged as we were.”

RELATED: McNeil-Smith ousts incumbent for Sidney mayor’s seat

But Price’s tweet also drew attention to the 2018 municipal election during which he lost the mayor’s vote by almost three thousand votes to current McNeil-Smith.

When asked on the record whether he was a victim of “Green Party campaign organizers” to elect what he called “a green slate,” Price declined comment.

Requests for comments from May, who did not respond to Price’s tweet, have so far gone unanswered and the Peninsula News Review will update this story accordingly.


Like us on Facebook and follow @wolfgang_depner

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

District of houston
Council dips into surplus for highway project

Costs have risen to place utility lines underground

“Skeena,” by John Hudson and Paul Hanslow is one of five fonts in the running to become the default for Microsoft systems and Office programs. (Black Press Media File Photo)
Font named after Skeena River could become the next Microsoft default

One of the five new fonts will replace Calibri, which has been Microsoft’s default since 2007

Accessibility improvements and more classrooms at the Houston Christian School should be completed by the new school year. (Houston Today photo)
Accessibility improvements coming to Houston Christian School

Construction package includes two classrooms

The soft opening of the nature centre at the Buck Creek CANFOR hatchery took place mid-April. (Angelique Houlihan photo/Houston Today)
Houston hatchery and nature centre’s upcoming events

The conservation group to host summer students this year

Protesters attempt to stop clear-cutting of old-growth trees in Fairy Creek near Port Renfrew. (Will O’Connell photo)
VIDEO: Workers, activists clash at site of Vancouver Island logging operation

Forest license holders asking for independent investigation into incident

Junior A team Coquitlam Express is offering all Tri-City residents who get vaccinated against COVID-19 a free ticket to one of their games. (Facebook/Coquitlam Express)
B.C. hockey team offering free tickets to hometown fans who get the COVID-19 vaccine

‘We know the only way to get fans back is people getting vaccinated,’ says Express’ general manager Tali Campbell

Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon speaks in the B.C. legislature, describing work underway to make a small business and tourism aid package less restrictive, Dec. 10, 2020. (Hansard TV)
B.C.’s latest COVID-19 restrictions cost thousands of service jobs

Part-time workers set back again by spike in virus spread

A sign indicating face coverings are required by the establishment is pictured on the front door of a business in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. COVID-19 cases have been on a steady increase in the province of British Columbia over the past week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A sign indicating face coverings are required by the establishment is pictured on the front door of a business in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. COVID-19 cases have been on a steady increase in the province of British Columbia over the past week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Leaked report shows detailed B.C. COVID-19 data not being released to public

Documents obtained by the Vancouver Sun show cases broken down by neighbourhoods

Abbotsford school board trustee Phil Anderson has stepped down after sharing an offensive image on Facebook. (File photo)
Abbotsford trustee temporarily steps down after sharing post relating COVID masks to slavery

Phil Anderson to receive training to better understand provincial mask mandate after posting picture

B.C. announced the launch of an app May 7 that connects youth struggling with mental health and substance use with “life-saving” social services. (Screen grab)
5 years in the making: Mental health app for youth and children launches in B.C.

The province provided $1.6-million to fund a virtual care platform

Amazon has announced the creation of five new facilities in B.C., to employ about 2,000 people. (Amazon/Special to Black Press Media)
Amazon adds new facilities in Langley, Pitt Meadows, Delta, Vancouver

The Vancouver port centre will be the first Amazon centre to feature robotics in B.C.

A worker rides a bike at a B.C. Hydro substation in Vancouver, on Friday, April 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
BC Hydro report raises safety concerns as pandemic prompts jump in yard work

Incidents involving weekend tree trimmers, gardeners and landscapers have risen 30% since the pandemic hit

Starting Tuesday, May 11, B.C. adults born in 1981 and earlier will be able to register for a vaccine dose. (Haley Ritchie/Black Press Media)
BC adults 40+ eligible to book COVID-19 vaccinations next week

Starting Tuesday, people born in 1981 and earlier will be able to schedule their inoculation against the virus

Most Read