Steep hill at the end of Tweedie Avenue poses threat to those who travel it.

Council considers staircase option

Town council is stepping up to the challenge of finding a way for residents to climb or descend the Tweedie Avenue hill.

Town council is stepping up to the challenge of finding a way for residents to climb or descend the hill at the end of Tweedie Avenue, during which installation of a stairwell was proposed.

Coun. Tim Anderson first proposed this at the town council meeting saying that he has seen people slipping and getting injured as they go through the steep right-of-way.

“Last year, an elderly lady broke her ankle is what I was told going down that hill there,” Coun. Anderson said. “I’ve slid down it too. You see kids walking down, they’re sliding down, they’re slipping especially winter time.”

“I think that’s a good idea,” Coun. Jonathan Van Barneveld said to council.

Van Barneveld would like the town to look into how they can build a staircase that lasts through winter, including building open-frame stairs that allow snow to fall through.

However, Coun. Dawn Potvin has heard dissent from residents, as that right-of-way leads people through a residential neighbourhood.

“I’ve already heard from community members that live on that street that they’re not in support of it because they figure it will increase traffic,” Coun. Potvin said to council.

Local resident Jim Highstead said he has seen many children fall down the hill, but doesn’t have a strong opinion on building a staircase.

“They’ve talked about it once before and the thought about the liability was so great that they didn’t want to do it, from what I was told, from years ago,” Highstead said. “I don’t have an opinion one way or the other. Traffic still comes down, I don’t think it will change, and I don’t have a problem with that.”

“I don’t mind, if they want to, it’s been good on the other one over the years, so I don’t see a problem with it.”

Highstead says his neighbours rarely make a fuss about the hill and its traffic.

Some of BV Foods’ customers also use the hill to come to his store. Its owner, Sanj Sadhir, sees a benefit in building a staircase on the hill.

“They won’t fall in the winter. Some come sliding down here when it’s too icy. Sometimes a lot of the kids do fall off, so they would benefit greatly,” Sadhir said.

Back at council, councillors agreed to move forward by looking at other options.

“Maybe the best way to move forward is to have staff have a look at a few different options, prices,” Mayor Shane Brienen said to council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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