A North Korean flag flutters in the wind atop a 160-meter tower in North Korea’s village Gijungdongseen, as seen from the Taesungdong freedom village inside the demilitarized zone in Paju, South Korea, Tuesday, April 24, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Lee Jin-man

Canada bracing for health, political fallout from North Korean nuke test: memos

Internal memos show Canadian officials have been quietly preparing for the fallout from a possible atmospheric nuclear weapons test by North Korea.

Internal memos show Canadian officials have been quietly preparing for the fallout from an atmospheric nuclear-weapons test by North Korea, including the spread of radioactive debris across the Pacific and the major public concerns that would arise.

In the event of a test, Health Canada’s radiation-protection bureau would monitor contamination, while various federal agencies would manage any dangers and ensure the public is kept informed.

Scenarios mapped out by the bureau suggest radiation levels would depend on the size and height of a detonation and weather patterns over the Pacific Ocean.

A presentation prepared for Health Canada’s deputy minister says experience in fallout monitoring indicates that contamination would be well below levels of public health concern.

But ”significant public and political concern” are anticipated, and officials expect to be juggling everything from testing the safety of the food supply to evaluating the hazards to travellers and Canadians living abroad.

The Canadian Press used the Access to Information Act to obtain a copy of the briefing materials.

Related: North and South Korea say they plan to bid for 2032 Olympics

Related: Koreas agree to break ground on inter-Korean railroad

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Giesbrecht found guilty of second-degree murder

Murder is only rational conclusion from evidence, Judge says

Fire ban back in effect for Northwest Fire Centre region

Starting May 24, both Category 2 and Category 3 prohibitions will be in place

Convicted animal abuser Catherine Adams to return to B.C. court in July

Catherine Adams is under a 20-year ban on owning animals, from a 2015 sentence in Smithers

Good job boys

Oakley (L) and Storm sold lemonade in Houston to raise money to… Continue reading

The north, rural areas deserve own ICBC rates, says Houston council

Matter to be considered at provincial convention this fall

B.C.’s fight to regulate bitumen through pipelines to go to Canada’s top court

BC Appeal Court judges found B.C. cannot restrict bitumen flow along Trans Mountain pipeline

Scheer says it would take Conservatives five years to balance budget

Scheeraccused the Liberal government of spending $79.5 billion of previously unbudgeted funds

B.C. man, 30, arrested for driving his parents’ cars while impaired twice in one day

The Vancouver-area man was arrested after officers caught him driving impaired twice in one day

New airline regulations bring compensation for tarmac delays, over-bookings

Some of the new regulations will roll out in July, while others are expected for December.

More than half of Canadians support ban on handguns, assault rifles: study

Divide between rural and urban respondents in latest Angus Reid Institute public opinion study

Spring rain needed as B.C. sees one of the lowest snowpack levels in 40 years

Snowpack levels in B.C. recorded on May 15 were similar to those in 2015 and 2016

Theresa May to quit as party leader June 7, sparking race for new PM

The new Conservative leader will become prime minister without the need for a general election

B.C. man who fell off cliff returns there to rescue eagle from vulture attack

Nanaimo’s James Farkas, who broke his hip in a fall, saves eagle on same beach months later

Raptors beat Bucks 105-99 to move within 1 game of NBA Finals

Leonard scores 35 as Toronto takes 3-2 series lead over Milwaukee

Most Read