Canada 150 ends on a cold note for much of the country

Canada 150 ends on a cold note for much of the country

But Heritage Minister Melanie Joly says Canadians celebrated warmly

Melanie Joly is the first to acknowledge Canada 150 had its share of ups and downs.

She doesn’t shy away from mentioning the torrential rains that flooded Parliament Hill’s Canada Day show and tries to laugh off the frosty temperatures that forced the cancellation of many New Year’s Eve events, including musical shows planned for Parliament Hill.

“We’re Canadians,” she says. “We’re used to dealing with Mother Nature.”

But Joly believes strongly the things Canadians will walk away with at the end of Canada’s big birthday bash won’t involve the weather.

“I think it was a success in terms of creating great memories for Canadians,” she said. “I really have a feeling of gratitude towards Canadians that really decided to embrace this unique occasion and unique opportunity and make it the best for themselves and for all.”

Heritage Canada budgeted $200 million for Canada 150 events and programming. Another $300 million went to a Canada 150 infrastructure project to upgrade community ice rinks and public parks. Parks Canada spent about $76 million to make national parks free for the year.

Joly said the goal was to invest in projects and “moments Canadians will remember.”

“I think that is one of the legacies is these memories Canadians will have about what they did on Canada Day, which projects went through their communities and how they celebrated,” she said.

For Joly, the story isn’t in the amount of rain or the freezing December. It’s in the numbers of people who joined in.

Heritage Canada says 87 per cent of Canadians participated in at least one Canada 150 event, with 31 million people overall.

There were 5,800 Canada 150 events across the country throughout the year, many of which drew enormous crowds. La Machine, a French theatrical performance involving giant robotic dragon and spider, attracted 750,000 people to downtown Ottawa in just four days in July, three times the expected turnout.

Free national parks and historic sites drew a record 27.3 million people through their gates. There was the 50,000-person strong Walk for Reconciliation in Vancouver, 1.4 million people who attended the tall ships events at ports in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes, and the biggest National Acadian Day in history.

The New York Times and Lonely Planet both ranked Canada as the number one place to visit in 2017 and international and domestic tourism was up 3.1 per cent for the year. That was led by a 7.1 per cent increase in overseas visitors and 2.7 per cent increase in American tourists, making it Canada’s biggest year for international tourism ever.

Ottawa, where many of the Canada 150 events were centred, saw overnight visits increase 5.5 per cent, the biggest for any city in the country. Montreal came in a close second at 5.1 per cent.

Guy Laflamme, the head of the non-profit Ottawa 2017 agency assigned to develop a year-long celebration in the nation’s capital, said from his perspective it was a “huge success.”

“I think we’ve changed the perception people have about Ottawa,” said Laflamme.

Laflamme said it is also important to note the entire year went off without a major security incident, a threat that hung heavy over anyone planning a public event in the era of Islamic State terrorist cells.

Some Indigenous youth made known they didn’t feel like there was a reason to celebrate, erecting a teepee on Parliament Hill on the Canada Day weekend as a protest. But that helped draw attention to the issues of reconciliation and Joly says it shows Canada can have a mature conversation about our weaknesses.

“Although the past 150 years have been far from perfect for Indigenous people I think this was a pivotal moment in time and I think there was more dialogue and openness on the part of non-Indigenous communities this year,” she said.

One-quarter of Canada 150 events were aimed at the reconciliation theme.

Chief Robert Joseph, the ambassador for Reconciliation Canada, said reconciliation is not an overnight event and one year isn’t going to tell its story.

“There are going to be a million little steps but every time we take one of them it’s progress,” he said.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 5, 2021. The province has suspended indoor dining at restaurants and pubs until at least April 19 in B.C. due to a spike in COVID-19 numbers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. sets new COVID-19 daily record with 1,293 cases Thursday

New order allows workplace closures when infections found

The new 3,500 hectare conservancy in Tahltan territory is located next to Mount Edziza Provincial Park. (BC Parks Photo)
New conservancy protects sacred Tahltan land near Mount Edziza Provincial Park

Project is a collaboration between Skeena Resources, conservation groups and the TCG

Mabel Todd, 83, of the Nak’azdli First Nation, leads a group of family members and advocates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as they walk along the so-called Highway of Tears in Moricetown, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Province, feds fund full cell service along ‘Highway of Tears’ following years of advocacy

A ‘critical milestone in helping prevent future tragedies’ after at least 10 Indigenous women murdered, missing along the route

Erin O’Toole, Conservative Party of Canada leader, answered questions during a Terrace District Chamber of Commerce event on April 6, 2021. (Screenshot/Terrace District Chamber of Commerce Facebook)
Erin O’Toole discusses Terrace issues during virtual event

Federal Conservative leader answered questions during a Terrace & District Chamber of Commerce event

Easter is on Sunday, April 4, 2021. How much do you know about Easter history and traditions? (Pixabay.com)
QUIZ: How much do you know about Easter?

Put your knowledge to the test with this short quiz about Easter and its traditions

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and Premier John Horgan describe vaccine rollout at the legislature, March 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
1,262 more COVID-19 infections in B.C. Friday, 9,574 active cases

Province’s mass vaccination reaches one million people

As of Saturday, April 10, people born in 1961 are the latest to be eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. (Black Press files)
B.C. residents age 60+ can now register to get their COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccine registration is now open to people born in 1961 or earlier

A new saline gargle test, made in B.C., will soon be replacing COVID-19 nasal swab tests for kids. (PHSA screenshot)
Take-home COVID-19 tests available for some B.C. students who fall ill at school

BC Children’s Hospital plans to provide 1,200 kits to Vancouver district schools this April

Ruming Jiang and his dog Chiu Chiu are doing fine following a brush with hypothermia that saw several people work together to get them out of the Fraser River near Langley’s Derby Reach Park on March 25, 2021 (Special to the Advance Times)
Man finds men who rescued him from drowning in B.C.’s Fraser River

A grateful Ruming Jiang says he will thank them again, this time in person when the pandemic ends

Tyson Ginter, 7, is proud of his latest Hot Wheels he recently received by Quesnel RCMP Const. Matt Joyce. (Photo submitted)
B.C. Mountie handing out toy cars to light up children’s faces

‘A lot of times it will be the only interaction they have with the police,’ says Const. Matt Joyce

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam speaks during a technical briefing on the COVID pandemic in Canada, Friday, January 15, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s ICUs see near-record of COVID-19 patients last week as variant cases double

Last week, Canadian hospitals treated an average of 2,500 patients with COVID-19, daily, up 7% from the previous week

University of Victoria rowing coach Barney Williams at the University of Victoria in Victoria, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
UVic, women’s rowing coach deny former athlete’s allegation of verbal abuse

Lily Copeland alleges coach Barney Williams would stand close to her and speak aggressively in the sauna

Librarian Katie Burns with the Fraser Valley Regional Libraries poses for a photo in Chilliwack on June 18, 2019. Monday, April 12, 2021 is Library Workers’ Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of April 11 to 17

Library Workers Day, That Sucks! Day, and Wear Your Pyjamas to Work Day are all coming up this week

Most Read