B.C. Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

B.C. Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

B.C.’s COVID-19 road checks won’t require travel documents

Regional travel ban working voluntarily, minister says

B.C. is beginning enforcement checks of its COVID-19 non-essential travel restrictions, with police checking highway and ferry routes in and out of the Lower Mainland and an emphasis on education, rather than assessing fines.

Police may ask drivers for a name, address and driver’s licence but “documentation regarding travel will not be required, and passengers will also not be asked to provide this information,” Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth said Friday. The latest order imposes fines for non-essential travel between the Lower Mainland, B.C. Interior and Vancouver Island.

Road checks will focus on Highway 1 out of Hope to the three B.C. Interior routes, and ferry routes to Vancouver Island. Beyond that, the public health advisory to stay local within the three areas is in effect, and it’s working on a voluntary basis, Farnworth said. The regional travel order continues to May 25.

Tourists accommodation operators are reporting that people are voluntarily cancelling or re-booking their stays until after the Victoria Day long weekend, and ferry travel is down 25 per cent across the fleet in the first week since the new order was announced, Farnworth said.

Police road checks will include warning signs several kilometres in advance, so drivers are prepared and have the option of turning back if their trip is non-essential. The public safety ministry released a list of trips deemed essential, including avoiding risk of abuse or violence, and social visits to seniors in long-term care and assisted living.

Other essential travel includes going to work or school, transporting commercial goods, moving or assisting someone to move, receiving health care or social services or assisting someone to do so, attending court or complying with a court order, going to a funeral and returning to a principal residence.

Police are authorized to assess a fine of $230 for failing to follow instructions at a road check or $575 if the reason for travel violates the essential travel health order, and driver information will only be recorded if there is a ticket issued. West Vancouver and Delta Police are staffing road checks at ferry terminals and the RCMP will run road checks on highways between the regions.

“Spreading this message will be more important than giving out tickets,” Farnworth said.

RELATED: Running illegal nightclub like selling fentanyl, B.C. judge says

RELATED: No injured worker funds for sick pay, B.C. Liberals say


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislatureBC politicsCoronavirus

Just Posted

Workers had a busy time today repairing a broken main water line. (District of Houston photo)
Water service being restored

Main line on 13th had broken

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week following the news that the remains of as many as 215 children were found buried on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. The flags were raised back up yesterday. (Houston Today photo)
Flags lowered in memory

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week… Continue reading

Bruce Tang- Unsplash photo
World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

“Older adults in our communities continue to find themselves in vulnerable situations… Continue reading

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement June 1. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

The Queen Victoria statue at the B.C. legislature was splattered with what looks like red paint on Friday. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)
Queen Victoria statue at B.C. legislature vandalized Friday

Statue splattered with red paint by old growth forest proponents

Police cars are seen parked outside Vancouver Police Department headquarters on Saturday, January 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver police officer charged with assault during an arrest in 2019

The service has released no other details about the allegations

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen receives medical attention after collapsing during the Euro 2020 soccer championship group B match between Denmark and Finland at Parken stadium in Copenhagen, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, Pool)
Christian Eriksen in stable condition, Euro 2020 match resumes

Eriksen was given chest compressions after collapsing on the field during a European Championship

Members of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ Marine Mammal Response Program rescued an adult humpback what that was entangled in commercial fishing gear in the waters off of Entrance Island on Thursday, June 10. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Response Program)
Rescuers free humpback ‘anchored’ down by prawn traps off Vancouver Island

Department of Fisheries and Oceans responders spend hours untangling whale

As stories of the horrors of residential schools circulate after the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc First Nation announced it had located what are believed to be the remains of 215 children, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs said he feels a connection with the former students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
2 sides of the same coin: Ex-foster kids identify with residential school survivors

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says the child welfare system takes Indigenous children from their families

Nathan Watts, a member of the Tseshaht First Nation near Port Alberni, shares his story of substance use, a perspective he said isn’t seen enough. (Photo courtesy of Nathan Watts)
Public shaming, hate perpetuates further substance use: UVic researcher

Longtime addict Nathan Watts offers a user’s perspective on substance use

Most Read