As crime rates in Canada increase, confidence in policing drops: poll

Crime rates in Canada dropped steadily from 1991 until 2014, but have since increased in the past four years

As crime rates in Canada are on an upwards trend the public’s confidence in policing is decreasing, according to a new nationwide poll.

Angus Reid Institute released its biennial study on perceptions of crime Friday, which asked 1,655 Canadians about their perceptions on crime and the justice system.

Crime rates in Canada dropped steadily from 1991 until 2014, falling more than 50 per cent during that period, but have since increased in the past four years, according to Statistics Canada data.

ALSO READ: Sexual assaults, extortion on the rise even as crime rates stay low

Half of respondents, or 48 per cent, said they feel crime has increased in their community over the past five years, up from 42 per cent in 2018 and 30 per cent in 2014.

Fifty-seven per cent of respondents from B.C. said they have noticed an increase, while 31 per cent reported seeing no change. Four per cent said they feel there has been a decrease.

According to Statistics Canada’s crime severity index, the severity of crime in the province has increased by nearly eight percentage points since 2014. Meanwhile, the actual number of reported incidents have remained steady since 2015.

Eighty-two per cent of B.C. respondents reported that in the last two years they have been a victim of a crime which they reported to police.

But as perception of crime increases, confidence in policing has been on the decline since 2014, Angus Reid suggests.

Just under 55 per cent of British Columbians said they feel confident in the RCMP’s national efforts to stop crime. That’s compared to 67 per cent in 2014. Meanwhile, 57 per cent felt confident in their local municipal police force or RCMP detachment, compared to 63 per cent.

Among all respondents, the number of visible minority residents who say they have “no confidence at all” in the RCMP was double that of non-minority respondents, or 17 per cent compared to nince per cent, the poll results found.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

Salmon closures announced for Skeena and Nass watersheds

DFO notice expands on May 21 chinook ban throughout Skeena watershed

New traffic lanes for Six Mile west of Burns Lake coming soon

Construction to begin on lane extension and traffic improvement

Chamber names new board for 2020

And emphasizes that Houston is open for business

Houston to host high speed electric vehicle charging station

It will be installed and paid for by BC Hydro

COVID-19: B.C. landlords can’t evict if they decline rent assistance

Emergency order ‘incentive’ for federal program, Carole James says

Investigators probe death of CN employee at Surrey rail yard

Transportation Safety Board is investigating an ‘occurrence that took place during switching operations’

Trans Mountain starts B.C. leg of pipeline twinning project

Mostly finished in Alberta, Burnaby terminal expanding

NDP getting COVID-19 wage subsidy ‘indirectly,’ B.C. Liberal leader says

Andrew Wilkinson says he’s heard no concerns from public

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Love flourishes at Peace Arch Park, but COVID-19 concerns loom

South Surrey park becomes only place for international couples to meet

Most Read