9th annual Houston toy run was a success

toys
toys
toys
toys
toys

On Sept. 25, the ninth annual Houston Toy Run took place to raise money and toys, with all the proceeds going to the Salvation Army.

According to event coordinator Nichelle Cranmer, there were 19 bikes and 22 riders participating in the planned ride, which included several stops along the way. “We drove out to Granisle and had a wonderful lunch put on by Bills Restaurant, where a large amount of money came from. We then were escorted through town with the local fire department waving at people and collecting donations from the wonderful people out there,” she said.

“We then the rode back and went to Topley fire hall where we were escorted through town with the fire department. They held a show and shine and had so many toys donated for us to take back. They also had a volunteer take the toys back to town with us in their vehicle. Next, we went through Topley and stopped at the grocery store where they had a donation jar set up for us there. Finally, we then rode back to Houston to meet up with the Salvation Army and hand over all the wonderful toys and money that was raised.”

Houston Today also spoke to Kelly Spurway, a community ministry and family services supervisor for the Nechako-Bulkley Valley, who said that a total of $1,560 was raised, along with between 90 and 100 toys.

“This event was a wonderful success,” said Spurway, who works at the salvation army as part of her position. “Each year, the Salvation Army put on a Christmas hamper program in which households who register with us receive four gifts per child, treats, a gift formom and dad and a Christmas meal.”

Registration for the program begins the first week of November and ends the first week of December, at which point workers with the Salvation Army begin putting together the Christmas hampers for each household.

“The donations from this event will help immensely with the program, taking a burden off us to try to find the toys and the money. We’re very grateful for all participants and the communities that supported it,” said Spurway.