Coastal GasLink workforce at 1,000 women and men – and growing

Construction is ramping up on the Coastal GasLink Project, with more than 1,000 women and men, many of them local and Indigenous, working across the 670-kilometre project right-of-way in January. Employment numbers are expected to grow as activities increase, with pipe assembly beginning this summer and continuing through 2022.

The project continues to deliver benefits to Indigenous and local communities; $870 million in contracts have been awarded since the Final Investment Decision was made in October 2018. As of November 2019, the most current figures available, the project has generated more than $107 million in local spend and more than $77 million in indirect economic spinoffs. This number will continue to grow.

Coastal GasLink’s workforce is expected to grow to 2,500 at peak of construction

“Not only does construction create thousands of high-quality jobs, it creates demand for things like construction and maintenance equipment, food services, accommodation and more. Our contractors are mandated to source local wherever they can, including for equipment and supplies,” said Dan Bierd, Coastal GasLink’s vice-president of pipeline implementation.

“There are also many indirect benefits to local communities,” added Bierd.

For example, Fred Wilson of Northwest Truck Rentals in Smithers, B.C., is supplying rental vehicles to Coastal GasLink and its contractors.

“I’m proud to support both Coastal GasLink and its partner, LNG Canada,” said Wilson.

Just prior to the holidays, Wilson put his mechanic to work building a special lighted sign to show his support for the LNG project.

“My mechanic spent 39 hours making that sign from plywood. We wanted to bring some awareness to the project in our backyard,” he added.

Fred Wilson from Smithers, B.C. is proud to support Coastal GasLink and LNG Canada

The $40-billion LNG project represents the largest single private sector investment in Canadian history.

“Not only is my business benefitting, this project is bringing long-term economic benefits to our community – hotels, local industrial and supply stores, airlines and even local restaurants. I also see a lot of Indigenous businesses working out there and benefiting. This is making a real difference to local families and is important to the long-term sustainability of our community,” said Wilson.

“The healthier our community is, the healthier the north is,” he added.

Once complete, the project is estimated to contribute $20.88 million in annual property tax benefits that will support northern community services such as fire protection, policing, hospitals, schools and waste management.

Stay connected and learn more about project activities at www.CoastalGasLink.com

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Fred Wilson from Smithers, B.C. is proud to support Coastal GasLink and LNG Canada.

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