Diabetes nurse educator Mrs. Pudding

Diabetes nurse educator Mrs. Pudding

Mrs. Pudding hands out diabetes tips with spunk

Mrs. Pudding adds humour and flair to diabetes education, posing as a spunky granny sharing stories and tips on treatment and prevention.

Mrs. Pudding’s humour and spunky, granny-style drew lots of laughs as she taught memorable tips on diabetes.

Acting as a feisty granny who’s been fighting diabetes for ten years, Mrs. Pudding shared her stories and what she learned along the way.

The key for people with or without diabetes is HEAL – Healthy Eating, Active Living – she told the 20 people gathered at the Seniors Centre last Tuesday.

“You’ve got to become a member of the HEAL team. You’ve got to embrace that ya? For your family, your kiddies, your grand kiddies, and for your community,” she said.

For healthy eating, Mrs. Pudding said the trick is “the hand jive.”

“No, no! Not dancing!” she joked. “It’s with your hands. Those are your measuring tools. Mine are the right size for me, and yours are the right size for you. So if you want to know how much to eat at one time, this is how it goes,” she said.

Make a fist and cut it off at the wrist, that’s how much carbohydrates you should have in one sitting, she said.

Take the palm of your hand and chop the fingers off. The fingers is how much meat or protein you should have.

“Here’s the kicker,” she said holding up one thumb. “That’s for the fat.”

For the veggies, Mrs. Pudding cupped two hands together.

“Now, I know what a lot of you want to do with those vegetables: You want to chuck those out the window,” she said, throwing her cupped hands up to her shoulder.

“Don’t get rid of those! Those have got the vitamins and minerals, and those are going to fight off the cold and flu and infection,” she said, adding that they also have fibre.

Lastly, one cupped hand is for fruit and sweeter foods, she said.

The other aspect of being healthy is active living, and being busy doesn’t count as active, Mrs. Pudding said.

“You’ve got to put your activity back into your living,” she said, adding that a good place to start is walking, swimming or even making kayaking movements with your arms while sitting.

Her next quick tip was Sweetheart.

“You’ve got to pamper your sweet heart. Put your energy towards your heart and you manage everything else,” she said, adding that it helps fight and prevent other chronic diseases as well.

Heathy eating and active living is the foundation, and with regular blood sugar testing and no smoking, diabetes is manageable, Mrs. Pudding said.

Concluding her talk, Mrs. Pudding welcomed everyone to a healthy luncheon cooked by volunteer nurses and diabetes specialists.

She sent people on their way with full stomachs, a pocketful of tips and a good dose of laughter.

“Good luck, good health and many blessings,” she said.

 

Just Posted

Workers had a busy time today repairing a broken main water line. (District of Houston photo)
Water service being restored

Main line on 13th had broken

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week following the news that the remains of as many as 215 children were found buried on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. The flags were raised back up yesterday. (Houston Today photo)
Flags lowered in memory

Flags at the District of Houston administrative building were lowered last week… Continue reading

Bruce Tang- Unsplash photo
World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

“Older adults in our communities continue to find themselves in vulnerable situations… Continue reading

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

The Queen Victoria statue at the B.C. legislature was splattered with what looks like red paint on Friday. (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)
Queen Victoria statue at B.C. legislature vandalized Friday

Statue splattered with red paint by old growth forest proponents

Police cars are seen parked outside Vancouver Police Department headquarters on Saturday, January 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Vancouver police officer charged with assault during an arrest in 2019

The service has released no other details about the allegations

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen receives medical attention after collapsing during the Euro 2020 soccer championship group B match between Denmark and Finland at Parken stadium in Copenhagen, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, Pool)
Denmark soccer player Christian Eriksen collapses during game against Finland

Eriksen was given chest compressions after collapsing on the field during a European Championship

Members of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ Marine Mammal Response Program rescued an adult humpback what that was entangled in commercial fishing gear in the waters off of Entrance Island on Thursday, June 10. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Response Program)
Rescuers free humpback ‘anchored’ down by prawn traps off Vancouver Island

Department of Fisheries and Oceans responders spend hours untangling whale

As stories of the horrors of residential schools circulate after the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc First Nation announced it had located what are believed to be the remains of 215 children, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs said he feels a connection with the former students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
2 sides of the same coin: Ex-foster kids identify with residential school survivors

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says the child welfare system takes Indigenous children from their families

Nathan Watts, a member of the Tseshaht First Nation near Port Alberni, shares his story of substance use, a perspective he said isn’t seen enough. (Photo courtesy of Nathan Watts)
Public shaming, hate perpetuates further substance use: UVic researcher

Longtime addict Nathan Watts offers a user’s perspective on substance use

Most Read