Local cancer survivor launches new book

Writing her memoir "Running from Cancer" is one of the things that keeps DebiLyn Smith feeling strong and grateful she's alive.

DebiLyn Smith will be launching her book “Running From Cancer” in Houston May 15 from 1:00 to 6:00 pm at Countrywide Printing.

Ripping down a slope of knee deep powder is one thing that keeps DebiLyn Smith feeling strong and grateful that she’s alive. Another has been writing a book called “Running From Cancer”, a testament of her recent experience with breast cancer.

“You have to have something in life that makes you want to keep going” she says after her or- deal with surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation. “I have my family, my friends and a zest for life that has really been put to the test over the past 18 months, but I’m still swinging. I’ve learned to quit running from cancer; to stand up and fight back.”

When asked what her biopsy diagnosis was, either good or bad, Debi replied, “Depends on how you look at it. It was bad news that I was about to face a gruelling journey in a battle for my life. But it was good news that they found the cancer in the first place. I’m told they didn’t have the technology to find the macro size of metastasis in my lymph node as early as one year ago. That’s about the point where I became very thankful to the cancer organizations of the world.”

The Canadian Cancer Society’s Relay For Life fundraises for research projects that strive to overcome cancers. There’s a hot line you can call and talk to another survivor who has gone through what you are facing, compliments of fundraising dollars. Going through chemotherapy alone can be scary but the Canadian Cancer Society hosts group meetings where a room full of survivors together with new cancer patients talk about their experiences and what worked for them. “There is a list of things the Canadian Cancer Society does to give the fallen hope. To raise the spirits and keep us going,” Debi says.

“It’s all about attitude and re- fusing to give in. Some days it’s harder than others to keep your chin up. It’s been a year and a half now. I’ve been cut up, poisoned and nuked and I’ve had to look in the mirror and figure out who was now looking back at me. I’m definitely not the same person I was, but I’m thankful for every day that I get to wake up. And I hope to keep waking up for many years to come.”

Today cancer patients do have a good chance of living years after their diagnosis, especially when caught at an early stage like Debi’s was. She adds, “The key is information and prevention; understanding that cancer is like a lottery. We’re all born with tickets. Everyone has cancer cells inside them lying dormant, waiting for something to kick them off and multiply into tumors that can take your life from you. The key is to reduce the amount of tickets you’re playing with. If you smoke, give yourself another ticket. Are you overweight? Get another ticket. Drink more than 7 alcoholic beverages a week for women and 14 for men? Get that ticket. Are you a couch potato that doesn’t believe in daily exercise? Yup, get your ticket. The more tickets you have, the more chances you have of winning the cancer lottery; whether cancer runs in your family or not.”

“The secret is not to help cancer grow in the first place because having cancer sucks. You lose the person you were to someone al- ways wondering if this is their last day/week/month on earth; to a person always trying to stay one step ahead of the cancer cells with drug regimes that are hard on you, with positive think- ing that sometimes eludes you. If it wasn’t for the friends and family that kept cheering me on, of lifting me up when I started to sink, of the gifts of humor, encouragement and lies that I was looking well even when I wasn’t, I wouldn’t have made it as far as I have.”

“The biggest thing is the hope and love that we cancer survivors feel when people like you support the Canadian Cancer Society in any way.”

Debi’s book will be launching in Houston May 15 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Brewstirs and 1 to 6 p.m. at Countrywide Printing. She will be giving a reading of Running From Cancer: a tilted memoir at the Library on Thursday May 16 from 7 to 9 p.m.

A donation from each book sale goes to the Bulkley Valley Health Care and Hospital Foundation.

Running From Cancer: a tilted memoir is available in book or Kindle form through amazon.ca or amazon.com. Debi has a well-attended website with Alphabetical Cancer Prevention blogs, healthy recipes and samples from all three of her books.

 

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