Industrial plan is opposed

Over a dozen locals showed up to the council meeting on Aug. 16 to support Nancy and Harold Flemming’s argument

Several local residents attended the August 16 council meeting to support Nancy and Harold Flemming’s argument against Harms’ proposed industrial business on Estates Drive. No further decisions have been made by council at this time.

Over a dozen locals showed up to the council meeting on Aug. 16 to support Nancy and Harold Flemming’s argument against Harms’ proposed industrial business on Estates Drive Deborah Flemming presented on behalf of Nancy and Harold Flemming.

Deborah explained that Nancy and Harold specifically chose their home after reviewing the bylaw restrictions and zoning allowances specifically to that subdivision.

Aware that the bylaws allowed small businesses and agriculture, Nancy and Harold still felt that the location was an ideal place for their retirement home because the bylaws also indicted quiet and rural residential lifestyles.

“We acknowledge that a small towing company may fit into this description of home industry, but what we’re looking at is that the size of this business is not consistent with what this home industry definition states,” articulated Deborah Flemming.

Harms’ compound is eight times the maximum allowable size under the A2 bylaw.

A maximum of four industry related vehicles is permitted, and Mr. Harms has indicted that he has six vehicles related to this business.

Quiet time bylaw is between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.

“A tow truck company has non-regular work hours. They are 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days of the year, and cannot expect to stay within the required quiet time bylaw due to the nature of the business,” said Deborah.

Additional reasons for objection were made such as the proposed towing company building is three times closer to the Flemming residence than it is to the Harms’ residence.

Potential of devaluation of property values, noise and increased dust levels, as well as intersection safety were brought to attention.

“This tow truck company is the primary responder to heavy hauling of semis when they are disabled on the side of the road,” stated Deborah.

So, the vehicles required to tow in this business are of heavy industry.

“We are concerned about the impact of this business compared to the intent of the A2 zoning,” she said.

Deborah closed the argument with environmental considerations pertinent to the area and the development of this business.

“Within 150 meters of the property there is a drain that goes under Hwy. 16 directly into the Bulkley Valley River. What happens when one of these trucks, or large pieces of equipment, has a leak and they are not there to control it or act quickly?” underscored Flemming.

Members of council and local spectators were moved by Deborah’s presentation.

 

At this time no decision or action was made by council after receiving this information.